Saturday, October 17, 2015

Mehdi Amin-Amin

Background Information Regarding Eight Executed Bahá'ís Seen on Trial in the Documentary Iranian Revolutionary Justice In December 1981, eight members of the national governing body of the Bahá'ís in Iran were executed by firing squad after 14 days in prison. A secret trial was held for them behind closed doors and the entire event was recorded on video. The BBC has now released a documentary film called Revolutionary Justice in Iran, based on the footage of this trial which has been discovered after more than 30 years. Below you will find background information on each of the eight individuals who were arrested on 13 December 1981 and executed on 27 December of the same year.



Mehdi Amin-Amin
Mr. Mehdi Amin-Amin was born in Tehran on 4 July 1916. He finished primary and secondary studies at the Tarbiat School in Iran – a school opened by Bahá'ís which was later closed by the government as part of the crack down on the Bahá'í community. Mr. Amin-Amin graduated from the College of Law at Tehran University and obtained a permit as first grade attorney and opened his own private practice in Tehran. He married Ms. Bahiyyih Naimi with whom he had one daughter. Mr. Amin-Amin was a skilled and respected lawyer and a talented poet. As a lawyer, his recognized honesty and nobility of character won him exceptional trust by his clients. During the 1953 upheavals against the Bahá’ís of Yazd, he and two other Bahá’í lawyers were appointed by the National Spiritual Assembly – an elected national council which forms part of the Bahá'í administrative structure in all countries – to defend the imprisoned members of the Local Spiritual Assembly – an elected Bahá'í council at the local level – of Yazd. The court verdict was issued in favour of the Bahá’í defendants. Mr. Amin-Amin also headed the legal task force appointed by the National Assembly, taking a lead in drafting letters to authorities pleading for the rights of the Bahá'ís. At the time of the Revolution, despite the continued advice of his friends and family, Mr. Amin-Amin did not leave Iran as he considered it his duty to stay and serve his country. During the years immediately after the Islamic Revolution, Mr. Amin-Amin was ready to travel wherever his professional help was needed and rendered valuable service to his community. He was elected to the National Spiritual Assembly of the Bahá'ís of Iran after the abduction and disappearance of the members of previous National Assembly in August 1980.